6 habits of people who have successfully quit weed

We know quitting weed is no cake-walk, but when you’ve been using it for a while and it’s baked into your daily routine, giving up anything demands some serious focus and determination. We spoke with people who’ve been there, who have overcome the various hurdles you face when quitting weed, and asked them for advice on how others can go about it. Here’s what they had to say.

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We know quitting weed is no cake-walk, but when you’ve been using it for a while and it’s baked into your daily routine, giving up anything demands some serious focus and determination. We spoke with people who’ve been there, who have overcome the various hurdles you face when quitting weed, and asked them for advice on how others can go about it. Here’s what they had to say.

 1. Plan your process

If you’ve been smoking cannabis for a long time, it’s often not as simple as just going cold turkey and never looking at another joint ever again. An impulsive decision to quit, without any forethought, rarely sticks. So think about the details, like setting a date to quit. Work towards it. Will you reduce the amount you use each day until then? By how much? Setting yourself goals with manageable tasks will make quitting far more achievable than just winging it.

2. Old habits die hard

Never underestimate the power of temptation. People who successfully quit, make a conscious effort to avoid situations, people or things that might trigger the urge to smoke. For one successful quitter, it was steering clear of video games at a close mate’s house. He knew if he went back to that environment before he was ready, he would easily slip back into old habits.

3. Treat yourself

When you reach a milestone, make sure you remember to have a reward to look forward to (that isn’t a joint!). Celebrating your successes marks the occasion and allows you to take stock, and also helps you build momentum for the next step in the quitting journey. Make a list of what you will do at each milestone (one day, one week, two weeks, one month and so on). Involving family or friends can help support you along the way; they will also enjoy sharing your successes and worrying less about your weed use.

4. Clean home, clean mind

The process of clearing cannabis from your life is every bit as environmental as it is mental. Mark the next chapter of your life with a complete clean out at home. Throw out any old smoking accessories or memorabilia, like bongs, vaporisers, pipes, grinders, ash trays and so on. Wash all your clothes, soft furnishings and bedding to remove the smell of smoking.

5. Get moving

Making exercise a part of your routine is a common theme among successful quitters. Not only does it release endorphins (natural ‘feel-good’ chemicals in your brain), it also gives you time to clear your mind and release any physical or mental tension you might be feeling while you go without cannabis. Regular exercise will also help restore your lung function.

6. Track your progress

Some successful quitters also really enjoy the physical act of crossing weed-free days off a calendar, and looking back over a successful week, month or year. One described how journaling her thoughts every day helped sort out some chaotic thoughts while she quit. There are plenty of free calendar apps for your phone which allow you to journal during your daily commute and also track your progress over time – try our free Joint Effort app as a starting point.

Successful quitters tend to look at the bigger picture and use these habits not just to help them quit weed, but also as helpful tools to move forward in other areas of their lives.

Check out NCPIC’s Quit Kit to find a tool to suit your individual quitting needs.

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